MID-AUGUST LUNCH


MID-AUGUST LUNCH

Dir. Gianni Di Gregorio (2008); 75 min

FRIDAY, August 1st at 7 & 9:30pm

SATURDAY, August 2nd at 7 & 9:30pm

SUNDAY, August 3rd at 3pm

After penning the screenplay for 2008’s highly esteemed modern mafia film, Gomorrah, Gianni Di Gregorio set to creating a film all his own. Di Gregorio would write, direct, and star in Mid-August Lunch, a delicious portrait of a summer holiday which was actually shot in Di Gregorio’s real apartment and of which the average age of the cast would be 80. Di Gregorio stars as Gianni, who spends his days sipping white wine and doting on his somewhat demanding 93-year old mother in their shared apartment in Rome. August fifteenth, the Catholic feast day of the Assumption of Mary into Heaven (Ferragosto), marks the start of Italy’s vacation period when most businesses and shops are closed. Everyone around Gianni wants to leave the city for summer and due to some combination of his kind nature, guilt, and a couple of bribes, Gianni ends up taking in three more mothers for the holiday. Gianni makes the best of what he has and scrambles around town to put together a proper meal for everybody, succumbing only once to the stress of taking care of four mothers when he casually slips some sleeping pills into their chamomile tea. Winner of the 2008 debut director prize at the Venice film festival, at age 60, Di Gregorio serves up a rare Italian arthouse hit pitch-perfect in its dignity, humor, and unanticipated ability to move its audience. 

DARK HABITS

DARK HABITS

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar (1983); 114 min

FRIDAY, August 1st at 9:00pm

DIGITAL SCREENING – FREE ADMISSION

A cabaret singer desperate to escape the police after losing her boyfriend to a heroin overdose takes refuge in an unconventional convent. The sisters of the order of Humbled Redeemers (played by most of Almodóvar’s favorite leading ladies) are bent on vindicating fallen women and indulging in their own idiosyncratic pursuits including raising a tiger and dropping acid. Despite being rejected by the Cannes Film Festival for its ostensible sacrilege, Almodóvar’s third feature film Dark Habits, heralded his arrival as Spain’s future cinematic auteur. 

BEFORE SUNSET

BEFORE SUNSET

Dir. Richard Linklater (2004); 80 min

FRIDAY, August 8th at 7 & 9:30pm

SATURDAY, August 9th at 7 & 9:30pm

SUNDAY, August 10th at 3pm

Richard Linklater has always been a precocious experimenter with cinematic form, even while he makes big-hearted and goofy films like Dazed and Confused and The School of Rock. His two rotoscoped films Waking Life and A Scanner Darkly occupy a trippy, philosophical space that feels worlds away from the intimate romance told in his trilogy starting with Before Sunrise and ending with Before Midnight. The first film followed American kid Jesse (Ethan Hawke) as he randomly met a French woman named Celine (Julie Delpy) while on a train to Vienna. Both of them are on vacation, and although they instantly click, they can only promise to meet again one year later. The middle portion, Before Sunset, takes place nine years later, and the third film continues their story after another nine years. The effect is that over three films we see the characters’ relationship develop, while the two lead actors age accordingly (an experiment Linklater has also been conducting with a child actor in an upcoming film called Boyhood). Linklater’s filmmaking also develops as the films progress: in Before Sunset he tells their story in real-time, a fitting change of tempo from the other two films. The films work as a trilogy, but watch for Linklater to drop another film into this ongoing series in the year 2022.

FREAKS

FREAKS

Dir. Tod Browning (1932); 64 min

FRIDAY, August 8th at 9:00pm

DIGITAL SCREENING – FREE ADMISSION

A commercial flop when it premiered, and banned in the UK for 30 years, Freaks was revived in the 1960s and became a hit on the ‘70s cult circuit.  Director Tod Browning drew from his carnival background for this infamous early-talkie, casting real circus performers as the titular “freaks” to tell a story of greed and betrayal that challenges social perceptions of normalcy.  Its frank depiction of marginalized peoples has since won it canonical status among many film critics, but at the time it nearly cost Browning his career.

WOODSTOCK - THE DIRECTOR'S CUT


WOODSTOCK – THE DIRECTOR’S CUT

Dir. Michael Wadleigh (1970); 224 min

FRIDAY, August 15th at 7pm

SATURDAY, August 16th at 7pm

SUNDAY, August 17th at 3pm

It is perhaps necessary to note that for three days in the summer of 1969, a rock concert was given on an upstate New York farm, and 400,000 people attended -- far more than were anticipated, far more than paid, far more than could be fed or sheltered or cared for after injuries or drug overdoses. It rained, there was mud, all traffic in and out was gridlocked, and the music continued, night and day. It was filmed by a director named Michael Wadleigh and a team that included a young Martin Scorsese and the editor Thelma Schoonmaker, who would later edit all of Scorsese's movies. They exposed 120 miles of film, shot with 16 cameras. With all that film to choose from in the editing room, Wadleigh was able to give us dozens of tiny unrehearsed moments that sum up the Woodstock feeling. The remarkable thing about Wadleigh's film is that it succeeds so completely in making us feel how it must have been to be there.  How touching it is in this film to see the full flower of its moment, of its youth and hope. The decade began with the election of John F. Kennedy and ended as the last bedraggled citizens of Woodstock Nation slogged off the muddy field and thumbed a ride into a future that would seem, to many of them, mostly downhill.

 

-Roger Ebert

BAD BOY BUBBY


BAD BOY BUBBY

Dir. Rolf de Heer (1993); 114 min

FRIDAY, August 15th at 9:00pm

DIGITAL SCREENING – FREE ADMISSION

An Australian emotional epic that was never screened theatrically in the U.S. and has become a cult film for its extreme storyline (Bubby has been his mother’s sex slave his entire 35 year life). Its opening scenes rival David Lynch for prolonged awkwardness and sexual extremes, but the film goes places Lynch never dares. Beautifully shot with dozens of cinematographers, the film stays anchored thanks to the absurd and touching performance by Nicholas Hope as Bubby.

THE COLOR WHEEL


THE COLOR WHEEL

Dir. Alex Ross Perry (2011); 83 min

FRIDAY, August 22nd at 7 & 9:30pm

SATURDAY, August 23rd at 7 & 9:30pm

SUNDAY, August 24th at 3pm

Alex Ross Perry's black-and-white road trip comedy follows bickering brother and sister duo Colin (Perry) and JR (Carlen Altman, who has a co-writing credit) as they travel across the country when JR decides to move. Perry's previous credit was the trippy, quasi-Gravity's Rainbow adaptation IMPOLEX, which meandered along the festival circuit in search of cult appeal. The Color Wheel has plenty of that offbeat style but much more accessibility, being a sheer delight of sarcasm and uneasy wit. As Colin and JR continually trade barbs about each other and disgust everyone they encounter, Perry creates a blend of physical discomfort and awkward comedy unseen since Ronald Bronstein's "Frownland." (Perhaps not coincidentally, the two movies share a cinematographer, Sean Price Williams, whose grainy photography in "The Color Wheel" enhances the uncomfortable mood.) Perry has the irascible screen presence of a subversive Michael Cera, but his sub-literary persona suggests Woody Allen trapped in a nightmarish midnight movie. JR's former flame, a journalism professor played by filmmaker Bob Byington, accurately concludes that Colin is "a pathetic wreck of postgraduate stereotyping." Like everything else in The Color Wheel (especially its unnerving conclusion), the pronouncement teeters on the edge between comic put-down and tragic reality.

 

-Eric Kohn - Indiewire

THE GOONIES


THE GOONIES

Dir. Richard Donner (1985); 114 min

FRIDAY, August 29th at 7 & 9:30pm

SATURDAY, August 30th at 7 & 9:30pm

SUNDAY, August 31st at 3pm

What can we add to this film’s illustrious pedigree? Its Oregon locale, its 80s hybrid of action-adventure and pre-teen sex comedy, its quotable lines, it defines an era for many 80s (and 90s) kids. Pretty much, if you don’t like this movie, don’t tell anyone. Its status as a classic is unquestioned. The story follows a group of young kids who find a treasure map and plan to use the hidden pirate gold to save their homes from being demolished. Featuring a young Samwise Gamgee, aka Rudy, and a great tough-guy/older brother performance from 17 year old Josh Brolin. It also has Corey Feldman in it. Co-written by Steven Spielberg and Chris Columbus, both of whom have cornered the market in kids entertainment.